Syllabus – CLAS/ANTH 3009

Course Home
Syllabus
Online Study
CU Policies

Current Students: For the most up-to-date syllabus, please refer to your Desire2Learn course shell for CLAS/ANTH 3009.

Required Textbooks

  • Futrell, Alison. The Roman Games. Wiley-Blackwell, 2006.
  • Kyle, Donald G. Sport and Spectacle in the Ancient World. Wiley-Blackwell; 2 edition, 2014.
  • Meijer, Fik. The Gladiators: History’s Most Deadly Sport. St. Martin’s Griffin; Reprint edition, 2007.
  • Miller, Stephen. Arete: Greek Sports from Ancient Sources. University of California Press; 4th edition, 2012.
  • Miller, Stephen. Ancient Greek Athletics. Yale University Press, 2006.

 

 

Recommended for Further Study

  • Decker, Wolfgang. Sports and Games of Ancient Egypt. Trans. Allen Guttmann. Yale University Press, 1992.
  • Futrell, Alison. Blood in the Arena. University of Texas Press, 2000.
  • Mahoney, Anne. Roman Sports and Spectacles: A Sourcebook. Focus, 2001.
  • Spivey, Nigel. The Ancient Olympics. Oxford University Press, 2012.
  • Welch, Katherine. The Roman Amphitheater: From its Origins to the Colosseum. Cambridge University Press, 2007.

 

 

Grade Breakdown

Attendance                                       10%

1-Page Responses                             20%

Midterm Exam                                 35%

Final Exam                                      35%

 

Attendance & Assessments

Please be on time, present, and prepared for lecture every week. Attendance is mandatory. Attendance will be taken weekly in recitation. You may receive two excused absences over the course of the semester. However, you must inform me of your absence prior to class on the day you intend to be gone. I will not post lectures online, so you will be responsible for getting missed notes from your classmates. Reading quizzes will be conducted randomly throughout the semester. Again these will not be announced, so completion of readings and review of material is imperative prior to each week’s recitation. The midterm exam will be proctored during a normal scheduled lecture period, and the final exam will be scheduled accordingly during finals week. All assessments are to be completed individually. No group work, cheating, or plagiarism will be tolerated. These actions will result in an automatic F.

SCHEDULE OF LECTURES, READINGS, & ASSESSMENTS

 

 

 

UNIT I: THE GREEK AEGEAN

Egyptian Sports and Leisure

  • Why study ancient sports? (Course Intro)
  • Near Eastern & Egyptian Sports and Games

Readings: Kyle, Intro & Chap. 1 (pp. 1-36)

Sports in the Bronze Age

  • Minoan and Mycenaean
  • The Homeric Tradition (Games as Rituals and Politics)

Readings:

  • Kyle, Chap. 2 & 3 (pp. 37-69)
  • Miller, Chap. 1-2 (pp. 1-19)
  • Arete, Chap. 1-2 (pp. 1-22)

Athletics in the Archaic and early Classical

Olympic Origins

Readings: Kyle, Chap. 4 & 5 (pp. 70-106)

 

The Olympics: Theology and Training

  • Architecture of Olympia (Olympia’s early evolution)
  • The Gymansium
  • The Real Olympics [Part 1]
  • Athletics and Religion

Readings:

  • Miller, Chap. 3 (pp. 20-30)
  • Arete, Chap. 4 (pp. 63-80)
  • Kyle, Chap. 6 (pp. 107-131)
  • Miller, Chap. 6 (pp. 113-128)
  • Arete, Chap. 10, 13 (pp. 126-152, 165-180)

Olympic Events

  • Individual Events
  • Hand-to-Hand Events
  • Equestrian Competition

Readings:

  • Miller, Chap. 10-11, 13, 15 (pp. 166-197, 207-215, 226-234)
  • Arete, Chap. 3, 9 (pp. 23-62, 120-125)

Gender and Politics in the Games

  • Women in Greek Sports
  • The Real Olympics [Part 2]
  • The politics of winning (nationalism/ethnicity)

Readings:

  • Kyle, Chap. 9-11 (pp. 175-221)
  • Miller, Chap. 7-8, 14 (129-159, 216-225)
  • Arete, Chap. 6-7, 14 (pp. 89-110, 181-191)

 

Sports Beyond the Olympics and Olympia

  • Sport in the Athenian Agora
  • Panhellenic vs. Panathenaic Games
  • Games in the Classical and Hellenistic

Readings:

  • Kyle, Chap. 7-8, 12 (pp. 132-174, 222-242)
  • Miller, Chap. 4-5, 12 (pp. 31-112, 196-206)
  • Arete, Chap. 5, 11 (pp. 81-88, 153-159)

MIDTERM                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

UNIT II: ROME

Early Roman Sport

  • Sport in Rome’s Regal Period
  • Greece Meets Rome
  • Sport in the Roman Republic

Readings:

  • Kyle, Chap. 13 (pp. 243-267)
  • Futrell, Chap. 1 (pp. 1-10)
  • Arete, Chap. 12 (pp.  160-164)

Through the Eyes of the Spectator

  • The Psychology of Roman Sports
  • Roman Public Spectacle
  • Bread and Circuses (Politics and Sport)

Readings:

  • Kyle, Chap. 14 (pp. 268-288)
  • Futrell, Chap. 1 (pp. 11-51)

 

Rome’s Favorite Sport

  • The Circus
  • Charioteers
  • Women in Roman Sports

Readings:

  • Kyle, Chap. 15 (pp. 289-297)
  • Futrell, Chap. 2, 6 (pp. 67-76, 189-217)

Transitioning from the Republic to Empire

  • Naumachiae and Water Sports
  • Gladiators in the Republic
  • Evolution of Imperial Games

Readings:

  • Meijer pp. 1-95, 176-183
  • Futrell, Chap. 2, 6 (pp. 52-67, 77-83, 218- 221)

Gladiators

  • Amphitheaters and the Colosseum
  • The life of a Gladiator
  • A typical day at the Games
  • A Gladiator’s Legacy

Readings:

  • Kyle, Chap. 15 (pp. 298-328)
  • Meijer pp. 96-175
  • Futrell, Chap. 3-4 (pp. 84-137)
  • Kyle, Chap. 16 (pp. 329-342)
  • Meijer pp. 184-231
  • Futrell, Chap. 4-5 (pp. 138-188)

Ancient Sports Meets Modern Sports and Leisure

  • Revisiting “Bread and Circuses” (Star Trek)
  • The Damnation of Roman Games (The Hunger Games)  
  • Ancient Influence on Modern Sports

Readings:

  • Kyle, Conclusion (pp. 343-347)
  • Meijer pp. 232-235
  • Miller, Chap. 9 & 16 (pp. 160-165, 235-240)
  • Arete, Chap. 8, 15 (pp. 111-119, 192-200)

FINAL EXAM

Comments are closed.